The One Who Taught Himself to Code

by Erika B., Concordia Applied Journalism

We live in an information age. Throughout recent years, people have been desperately trying to find a way to take the Excel sheet to the next level. In the quiet corners of our campus, those with a passion for technology are finding ways to use tech to improve the human experience.

 

Learning Code requires a lot of time looking at screens, thinking logically and patting away at keys. (image: Erika B.,  Concordia Applied Journalism )

Learning Code requires a lot of time looking at screens, thinking logically and patting away at keys. (image: Erika B., Concordia Applied Journalism)

In the right hands, lines of complex code can elevate a two dimensional table worlds beyond its simple X and Y axis functions.

 

Throughout my subject’s new database development projects, this has became possible.

 

Who knows the this coder’s secret identity?

 

He started learning code while working on a Big Data Project. Through this project, my subject monitored air quality using nearly 50 purpose-built sensors throughout the school environment. This, of course, provided realtime numbers, details, and facts that begged to be organized. This avalanche of data is one of the key motivations behind my subject picking up the coding language. 

 

“There was a lot of practicality in [coding], because it does something that Excel can’t,” he explains. “It’s actually just like a ton of stacked Excel sheets.”

 

Though it looks like a colorful mix of letters, numbers, and symbols to the untrained eye, an experienced coder can translate this in minutes. (image: Erika B.,  Concordia Applied Journalism )

Though it looks like a colorful mix of letters, numbers, and symbols to the untrained eye, an experienced coder can translate this in minutes. (image: Erika B., Concordia Applied Journalism)

One of the initial projects was to develop a new sign-up system that digitized existing National Honor Society tutoring sessions. The program is an accessible tool in which a student can match up their need for a tutor in a specific subject area. The software is able to cross reference available times and tutors in a matter of seconds.

Taking his development skills to the next level, our subject designed a functioning system to help organize and co-ordinate the dozens of requests that are made of the Student Media Services organization every semester. The program captures input from those with media needs, and automatically notifies relevant SMS members and advisors. Projects are trackable through all stages of their completion.

And in the end, all of this self-motivated learning may just be the launchpad for his future beyond Concordia.  

From a system dominated by paper, e-mail and word-of-mouth, the new SMS database provides a dependable, trackable way for Concordians to request media projects.

From a system dominated by paper, e-mail and word-of-mouth, the new SMS database provides a dependable, trackable way for Concordians to request media projects.

“I want to major in something along the lines of engineering and coding, like maybe computer science during college,” he states.

Who is the secret coder in our midst?

Click here to find out.

 


Erika Journalism Bio.jpg

Erika B. is a senior student at Concordia International School, Shanghai. This is one in a series of community discovery articles called Who’s Got a Secret?

Originally from the US, Erika is making the most she can living overseas. She plans to go back to study ASL/ English Interpretation.


WANT TO KNOW MORE SECRETS?

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OR THE ONE WITH THE STORY ABOUT STORIES?