Ethical Debate: TASMUN 2019

by Andrew Y., Concordia Middle School Student

“With the announcement of the our first ever SDG MUN of improving city and urbanization, I declare the opening of the sixth Taipei American School Model United Nations for Your Today and for Our Tomorrow.” As the students rose in respect and applauded in revere, this topic began an ethical debate for two days and became not just another MUN, but a strong and concrete reflection upon our society.

Jimmy Q., an eighth grade Concordia delegate represents Togo with Evan Chua representing Poland on the issue of global warming.  (image supplied)

Jimmy Q., an eighth grade Concordia delegate represents Togo with Evan Chua representing Poland on the issue of global warming. (image supplied)

 After staying up late revising the resolutions, crafting the open speeches and taking initiative to level up their speech-delivering, the honorable Concordia middle school delegates walked with pride and confidence onto their podiums at their respective councils, speaking of global issues as the Green New Deal, cultural genocide in Xinjiang and peacekeeping in Central Africa.

Before the start of the conference, Concordia delegates were honored to have Mr. Ji Seong-Ho, a North Korean defector and political freedom activist as the speaker of MUN and to further discuss his tragedy of his arm and leg cut off while trying to cross a train to steal coal for food. His escape by walking 10,000km on crutches from North Korea to Thailand shocked us of the human rights violations and unethical and inhumane crimes that one can cause.

During the first day of the conference, groups began lobbying and discussing about the best and most effective way of combining up their resolutions, which often times meant collaboration and compromise. Subsequently, after submitting the resolutions, the delegates began debating about their resolutions and in different perspectives of the representation of their countries.

Minji K, a seventh-grade student, takes her initiative in her lobbying to strengthen her stance.  (image supplied)

Minji K, a seventh-grade student, takes her initiative in her lobbying to strengthen her stance. (image supplied)

 Through the second day of debate, Concordia delegates also learnt new MUN skills such as submitting amendments for resolution’s phrasing suggestions and POI (Point of Information) to inquire delegates considering their policies.

 In particular, some councils face a much more complicated situation than others. “As a fellow delegate of Human Rights Council,” David Wang said, “I am deeply touched by the inhumane treatments of our fellow mankind and the particular inhumane crimes in child abuse incident. It seemed like we should do something, but we can’t, we simply don’t have the ability or the gut to stand up against it.”

 TASMUN is the end of a conference, but the beginning of a journey of Concordia students to strive towards actively participating in global issues.  

Concordia students embrace one of Concordia’s ELRs: Become Active Global Citizens.

Concordia students embrace one of Concordia’s ELRs: Become Active Global Citizens.